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Socio-economic inequalities in life expectancy of older adults with and without multimorbidity: a record linkage study of 1.1 million people in England.

dianagosalvez Diana Gosálvez Prados last modified 20/09/2019 13:04

Age of onset of multimorbidity and its prevalence are well documented. However, its contribution to inequalities in life expectancy has yet to be quantified.


Chan MS, van den Hout A, Pujades-Rodriguez M, Jones MM, Matthews FE, Jagger C Raine R, Bajekal M. Socio-economic inequalities in life expectancy of older adults with and without multimorbidity: a record linkage study of 1.1 million people in England.  Int J Epidemiol. 2019 Mar 3. pii: dyz052. doi: 10.1093/ije/dyz052. [Epub ahead of print]. Available at: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6693817/


Article

20/09/2019

A cohort of 1.1 million English people aged 45 and older were followed up from 2001 to 2010. Multimorbidity was defined as having 2 or more of 30 major chronic diseases. Multi-state models were used to estimate years spent healthy and with multimorbidity, stratified by sex, smoking status and quintiles of small-area deprivation.

RESULTS:

Unequal rates of multimorbidity onset and subsequent survival contributed to higher life expectancy at age 65 for the least (Q1) compared with most (Q5) deprived: there was a 2-year gap in healthy life expectancy for men [Q1: 7.7 years (95% confidence interval: 6.4-8.5) vs Q5: 5.4 (4.4-6.0)] and a 3-year gap for women [Q1: 8.6 (7.5-9.4) vs Q5: 5.9 (4.8-6.4)]; a 1-year gap in life expectancy with multimorbidity for men [Q1: 10.4 (9.9-11.2) vs Q5: 9.1 (8.7-9.6)] but none for women [Q1: 11.6 (11.1-12.4) vs Q5: 11.5 (11.1-12.2)]. Inequalities were attenuated but not fully attributable to socio-economic differences in smoking prevalence: multimorbidity onset was latest for never smokers and subsequent survival was longer for never and ex smokers.

CONCLUSIONS:

The association between social disadvantage and multimorbidity is complex. By quantifying socio-demographic and smoking-related contributions to multimorbidity onset and subsequent survival, we provide evidence for more equitable allocation of prevention and health-care resources to meet local needs.


Chan MS, van den Hout A, Pujades-Rodriguez M, Jones MM, Matthews FE, Jagger C Raine R, Bajekal M.

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